Celsius-Lecture: The Magic of Muons

  • Date: –12:00
  • Location: Ångströmlaboratoriet, Lägerhyddsvägen 1 Sonja Lyttkens
  • Lecturer: Professor Chris Polly, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Chicago, IL
  • Website
  • Organiser: Faculty of Science and Technology
  • Contact person: Karin Thellenberg
  • Föreläsning

This lecture is part of the 2024 Celsius-Linnaeus lectures. The Celsius-Lecture is given by Professor Chris Polly, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Chicago, IL. The Celsius-lecture is followed by lectures given by Professor Johan Bijnens, Lund University, and Associate Professor Rebeca Gonzalez Suarez, Uppsala University. The session ends with a panel discussion moderated by Professor Karin Schönning, Uppsala University.

Here you can take part in the whole Celsius-Linnaeus program.

09.15: CELSIUS-LECTURE: The Magic of Muons

Professor Chris Polly, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Chicago, IL.

10.15: Break

10.30: The Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment

Professor Johan Bijnens, Particle and Nuclear Physics, Lund University

11.00: Searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the high energy frontier

Associate Professor Rebeca Gonzalez Suarez, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University

11.30: Panel discussion

Professor Chris Polly, Professor Johan Bijnens and Associate Professor Rebeca Gonzalez Suarez.

Moderator: Professor Karin Schönning, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University.

Abstract: The Magic of Muons

It has been 88 years since the discovery of the muon ushered in a revolution in our understanding of the basic constituents of matter. This enigmatic particle has intrigued scientists ever since and has been used for everything from X-raying pyramids to probing for the existence of other new particles and laws of nature in our quest to understand some of the greatest mysteries of our time. This talk will focus on some of the ways muons are being utilized in experiments today. In particular, intense particle accelerator-based sources, like the one at Fermilab, are paving the road to unprecedented sensitivity to new physics. Recent results from the Muon g-2 experiment and a broad overview of the future of muon physics will be presented.

Last modified: 2022-12-12